Teleworking by Kevin D. – Post 2

Teleworking by Kevin D. – Post 2

Post 2 – The Sequester

Kevin D. works for Adams County as the Legislative Liason.  Kevin started teleworking in August 2016 and offered to write about his experiences for a series of blog posts.  Read them in order starting with Post 1 – Getting Started.

Now completing my third week of teleworking I have setup routines that allow me to be just as productive as if I were in the office, and have established accountability measures that keep my supervisors informed of my work.

Having never teleworked before, I was cognizant of the fact that that the County was doing me a favor by allowing me to do this: no 3 hour daily commute, more desk time, easier commute to and from off-site meetings, etc., but being at home was not like being at the office in that it was not what I was accustomed to as a work place. However, having realized all that teleworking would allow me to do that I could not do working in the office, I was determined not to abuse this opportunity, but rather take advantage of it to show that I can successfully telework in my position and be just as effective as if I were in the office.  I was also concerned about accountability, since I would not be in the office and therefore would not be seen working by my supervisors.  To that end, I established a more regimented schedule and made a point of sequestering myself in my home office the first few telework days to get myself into the right mindset and to condition myself to know I was “at” work the moment I stepped into my home office, and it helped. I made those first couple of telework days stricter when it came to work, and created an environment as conducive to productivity as I could.  No small breaks throughout the day, no chatting with coworkers (or in this case my baby daughter and dog), eating lunch at my desk instead of with others or going out to lunch, etc.  After I got accustomed to that and got into the right mindset while in my home office, I eased up on the strictness of my day to make it more like my actual work life in the office, and I began to enjoy teleworking more because of my productivity levels and lack of fear of unaccountability.

dog desk

Annie helping to dog-ear legislative memos.

Now completing my third week of teleworking I have setup routines that allow me to be just as productive as if I were in the office, and have established accountability measures that keep my supervisors informed of my work. My supervisor and I touch base throughout the week on my progress and what I will be working on the coming week.  That helps me to stay on track and provide a set of deliverables, and allows my supervisors to track my work in a tangible way.  In addition, I provide County management and my supervisors with a weekly activity report summarizing my work for the week and my anticipated work for the coming week so they can chart my work and have conversations with me about what items they would like me to work on the following week.

I am sure as my teleworking progresses I will discover other advantages and disadvantages, but so far it seems to be working quite well. 

My family and I are happier because my “commute” is one floor, as opposed to 64 miles of rush hour traffic, which means I can spend more time with them after work.  And my supervisor is satisfied too.

My family and I are happier because my “commute” is one floor, as opposed to 64 miles of rush hour traffic, which means I can spend more time with them after work.  And my supervisor is satisfied since I am staying on-schedule, adhering to a work plan, am available throughout the day if needed, and am providing the same deliverables on the same schedule I would if I were in the office full time.  It is my goal to prove that teleworking, at least for my position, is just as effective as working in the office, but will provide for a better quality of life on my end, which in turn will make me a happier and more productive employee.

Post 3 – A Mouthful