Teleworking by Kevin D. – Post 3

Teleworking by Kevin D. – Post 3

Post 3 – A Mouthful

Kevin D. works for Adams County as the Legislative Liaison.  Kevin started teleworking in August 2016 and offered to write about his experiences for a series of blog posts.  Read them in order starting with Post 1 – Getting Started.

In one breath I was trying to lay out everything I had worked on for the past few days, all the meetings I took, and all the follow-up items I had for her.

Having teleworked for several weeks now, one big drawback that I discovered is not having the ability to interact with my colleagues throughout the day.  It’s easy to forget that co-workers usually bounce ideas off each other during the day, or talk about County business with each other (giving everyone a better sense of what the County is doing via the various departments and agencies).  During a recent phone conversation with my supervisor, she had to interrupt me several times just to get a word in.  In one breath I was trying to lay out everything I had worked on for the past few days, all the meetings I took, and all the follow-up items I had for her. Instead of spacing all of those conversations out throughout the week like I would have done if in the office every day, I tried to do it all at once and was not cognizant of the fact that it was an overwhelming amount of information to throw at someone at one time.

talking too much icon b&wconversationThe next week at work my supervisor apologized for interrupting me, but explained that I was giving her so much information and not allowing her time to ask questions that it was not helpful to her, as she was racing to take all that information in.  I realized she was right. I needed to have more frequent conversations with her, and my other colleagues, in order to keep them updated on a timelier basis as well as respect their time and allow for their input.  I also asked my wife if I was doing that with her when she asks about my day at work, and she laughed and said the same thing my
supervisor said.

Since I do not have the chance to interact with others during days in which I don’t have meetings, I take the opportunity to do a “brain dump” with the first person who asks about work, and I have to be more aware of that and take a more measured approach when briefing others. But that being said, realizing that has enabled me to take more advantage of my in-office work days to catch up with colleagues on County business, have internal meetings, brainstorm with folks, and all the other things that being in an office provides (as opposed to being at home).

Post 4 – The End of Days